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Treatable ID/MR







Vancouver is one of the most attractive cities I have visited.  It is home to BC Children’s Hospital and Dr Sylvia Stöckler-Ipsiroglu and Dr Clara van Karnebeek. Together they have produced a remarkably thorough website called Treatable-ID, which sets out information on 82 treatable forms of Intellectual Disability (ID), formerly known as Mental Retardation (MR).


ID/MR and Autism

ID/MR is defined as having an IQ less than 70; this means the cognitively weakest 2.2% of the population.

Classic Autism, Autistic Disorder or what we might now also call Strict Definition Autism affects about 0.3% of the population.  It is likely that about half of this group would score <70 in an IQ test.  I do not suggest they take one.

It is clear that an overlap might exist between the causes of MR/ID and the cause of some Strict Definition Autism.

In earlier posts I have referred to improving cognitive function in autism using Bumetanide.  We even saw that it should also improve cognitive function in Down Syndrome.

I suggested that Diamox/ Acetazolamide, another diuretic, could also have a similar effect (via the AE3 cotransporter).  One reader of this blog, Agnieszka, has been sharing her use of Acetazolamide, in the comments on the previous post.

People with RASopathies often have autism and MR/ID.  There are potential RAS therapies, one of which is a cheap statin drug.

We saw how dendritic spine morphology could be modulated and how that could affect cognitive function.  PAK inhibitors can, in theory, achieve this.



81 inborn errors of metabolism related to Intellectual Disability and amenable to therapy

The BC Duo have collated the data on 81 treatable forms of ID/MR.

Not surprisingly some of these 81 also lead to “autism”, so they must also be treatable.  Roger, one this blog’s followers, has at least one of these 81.

So I suggest that anyone interested in a type of autism with some degree of cognitive impairment takes a good look at their site.













These are the 81 inborn errors:-







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