UA-45667900-1

Comments from last 24+ hours (revised)


Some readers want to see the recent comment activity.  You can subscribe to the RSS news feed from this blog. 

https://epiphanyasd.blogspot.com/feeds/comments/default?alt=rss

Feedbucket - sometimes works sometimes not

Click the link below for the Feedbucket comment reader, that gives comments left on all threads sent in the last 24 hours. You can then just click on that comment to get sent directly back to that comment in the blog itself.  Quite useful. (this feature does not work on Ipads)

 Click here for comments from last 24 hours


The comment below were manually inserted from my Feed Reader.  I use www.feeder.co    (yes, feeder.co)

It is free, first sign up and the you just add the comment feed url for this blog.

https://epiphanyasd.blogspot.com/feeds/comments/default?alt=rss


You even get real time notifications of new comments, if you are that hooked.





Epiphany
 3 hrs
Tyler, Sodium Butyrate is also an HDAC inhibitor. ...
Tyler, Sodium Butyrate is also an HDAC inhibitor. This has been shown to improve beta cell proliferation in models of diabetes, so is interesting for those with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In some types of autism I think you can have too much inhibition of HDAC. We did have comments on this a long time ago when the commenter reported 500mg of butyrate was beneficial but 1,000mg was not.
Read more
Epiphany
 3 hrs
NEW
Pimavanserin was recently trialed in schizophrenia...
Pimavanserin was recently trialed in schizophrenia and while not very effective it was found to be well tolerated, so you could ask your doctor for a trial in Asperger’s.

I think a 5HT2A agonist might be a better choice in your case. These are generally controlled substances like LSD, but you can actually upregulate 5HT2A and stay on the right side of the law.

Activating CB2 will upregulate 5HT2A. You can activate CB2 with PEA (a legal supplement) or with cannabis (which may or may not be legal, depending where you live).

Reverse tolerance, when you gradually need less and less of a drug, is interesting. It is reported by Aspies and others that LSD has permanent effects.

I just had a quick google and saw that “Long-lasting alterations in 5-HT2A receptor after a binge regimen of methamphetamine in mice”.

It is clear why many Aspies use recreational drugs, just as it is clear why people with Schizophrenia smoke. Both groups are achieving a “medical benefit”, but not without other health or legal problems.

I think PEA (Palmitoylethanolamide) will be less effective, but it is safe and entirely legal.
Read more
Epiphany
 5 hrs
NEW
Here is some new research concerning butyrate prod...
Here is some new research concerning butyrate producing microbes in the gut and their effects in enhancing pro-longevity hormone called FGF21 which with respect to autism also causes reduced mTOR signaling:

Press Release:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/11/191114103128.htm

Paper:

https://stm.sciencemag.org/content/11/518/eaau4760

What is also very interesting is that as the mice aged in the experiment, their gut microbiota became less adept at producing butyrate which meant less production of FGF21 which is also important for neurogenesis. Nevertheless, the aging effects of diminished FGF21 production could be rescued with SODIUM BUTYRATE supplementation.

I know sodium butyrate and supplementing with dietary fiber to increase sodium butyrate has been discussed many times on this blog already, but this research is remarkable with respect to the possible benefits of sodium butyrate supplementation and the list of benefits likely critical to autism (reduced mTOR, increased neurogenesis, etc.).

It is hypothesized that C-section delivered babies (which have a higher risk of autism) get a poor start on life concerning their microbiome, so perhaps lack of butyrate production might have a role to play at some point post-natally in some people with idiopathic autism (just speculation).

Sodium butyrate is cheap so in light of this research I may give it another try even though I already supplement fiber for the purposes of butyrate production already.
Read more
Epiphany
 12 hrs
You can order the Mexican version of Bumetanide by...
You can order the Mexican version of Bumetanide by searching for it by one of its trade names "Miccil" on eBay. Good luck to you.
Read more
Epiphany
 15 hrs
Tradename for Bumetanide in Spain is Fordiuran, po...
Tradename for Bumetanide in Spain is Fordiuran, possibly in Portugal too.
NAC 600 could be too low a dose, I think Monty is using 2.4g/day (look at the PolyPill page of this blog)

/Ling
Read more
Epiphany
 17 hrs
Hi, can someone recommend me where can I buy bumet...
Hi, can someone recommend me where can I buy bumetanide? I've gone to 2 pharmacies here in Portugal and the people who were attending me didn't even know what is it and it wasn't available on pharmacies. Btw I've took NAC in the past ( 600mg per day ) and my OCD hallmarks didn't improve I think that NAC didnt do nothing to me, it was because of the dosage? My goal now is to improve my speech ( want to be able to do speeches and say complex sentences and I want to improve my mood as well ).
Read more
Epiphany
 19 hrs
Since I cannot find the original comment thread on...
Since I cannot find the original comment thread on here I will post my message here.

Peter, do you you think that this drug (Pimavanserin, 5HT2A inverse agonist) might have any therapeutic potential for Asperger's? The first time I took LSD I was able to very briefly experience mental visualization and the ability to read emotions on one's face for the first time in my life. Do you think a reverse tolerance effect could occur with this given the reduced 5HT2A receptors found in Asperger's? I am very interested in possibly trialing this thank you for sharing, Ling.
Read more
Epiphany
 20 hrs
Oh, nice finding Peter! I think I've got an ac...
Oh, nice finding Peter! I think I've got an acute urge to hug you too. :)

I've just found out that CB1 signaling can affect a mechanism implicated high up in my daughter's syndrome, and also in at least two other syndromes corresponding to interacting genes. All involve ID and language/apraxia issues. By quenching CB1 signaling, it might even help corpus callosum formation (which I just learned has a growth spurt between the ages of 9-12 years in humans).

Now I have a lot to digest!

/Ling

Read more
Epiphany
 20 hrs
https://materiamedica.ru/en/catalogue/innovative-m...
https://materiamedica.ru/en/catalogue/innovative-medicines/dietressa/
Read more
Epiphany
 21 hrs
Thank you AJ! I could hug you! :-D /Ling
Thank you AJ! I could hug you!
:-D

/Ling
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Ling, you might need to look across the Baltic to ...
Ling, you might need to look across the Baltic to your near neighbour. They even have an OTC product (meant for weight loss)

CB1 receptor antibodies

Antibodies of the CB1 receptor have been developed and introduced into clinical use in Russia.[27] They include brizantin (Russian: Бризантин®) and dietressa (Russian: Диетресса®).[27] Brizantin is indicated for the treatment of nicotine withdrawal and smoking cessation and dietressa is indicated for weight loss.[27] Dietressa is available over-the-counter in Russia.[27][1]

https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01570829
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Hi Ling, When you say it's important, you kno...
Hi Ling,

When you say it's important, you know your friends here will get right on it.

I've done a quick search, and will keep looking for you, but in the meantime, I thought you may find the following of interest:

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2015/238482/

A look at table 2 seems to identify the following:

- Yangoin (via Kava)
- Betulinic Acid (Chaga mushroom) - *Betulinic Acid is also a CB2 agonist
- Curcumin ( I would get a version like Meriva for absorption)
- 18β-Glycyrrhetinic acid (Licorice)

This is just after a quick review but I wanted to post just in case this is helpful!

AJ
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
I'm in big need of suggestions for repressing ...
I'm in big need of suggestions for repressing CB1 (cannabinoid 1) receptor signaling.
Rimonabant looks like research drug, and CBD seems to affect almost everything else too.

Hoping that Peter or the clever community can come up with something else for this. It's important.

/Ling
Read more



Epiphany
 2 hrs
Kevin, relocation can be extremely stressful for a...
Kevin, relocation can be extremely stressful for a child with autism and ID.

At the age of 8, my son’s long time 1:1 assistant left. This triggered a severe regression with self-injury and aggression towards others. It lasted almost a year.

Once things have got back to “normal”, I would definitely try Clemastine again. Rethink the dose perhaps. In another reader whose child suffered hypoxia it was effective.

I think you need to find a clever, open-minded, imaginative doctor. There might be some diagnostics tests that might be helpful. There are very few such doctors anywhere, one who does seem to fit the bill is in your part of the US, Dr Harumi Jyonouchi. She is an immunologist who treats people with autism and believes in personalized medicine. You have to be able to think out of the box, not just prescribe the same handful of medicines to everyone (typical autism doctor approach).

I would think an MRI would be helpful, but you need this organized by someone who knows what they are looking for, to make the most of the opportunity (there is also fMRI).

Bumetanide may be helpful and it is worth a trial.

If you knew myelin was a problem you could consider Ibubilast and indeed DMF.
Read more
Epiphany
 2 hrs

NEW
In children whose development is held back by poor...
In children whose development is held back by poor myelination, you would hope that Clemastine would gradually reduce that constraint. Depending on the level the child has already achieved it might be seen as improved motor skills (learning to walk, to write neatly, to ride a bike, to swim, tie shoelaces etc). In those who achieved good fine/gross motor skills I think there may be a development in higher level thinking skills, this is the effect I am seeing.

The effect of Clemastine should not be immediate, if it relates to myelin, it will take weeks or months. The benefit in MS is known to take time. I would try it for 3 months and then decide.

Clemastine also affects activated microglia and this might show as a beneficial effect rather faster.
Read more
Epiphany
 6 hrs
For people using clemastine what are we looking ou...
For people using clemastine what are we looking out for in a child , notice if it improves autism. Assuming this is a look term therapy after how many weeks months etc
Read more
Epiphany
 11 hrs
Thank you Carla! By the way, we did the GeneDx Xp...
Thank you Carla!

By the way, we did the GeneDx Xpanded Autism / ID panel, paid for it out of pocket, and it was expensive but worth it as it is a trio that identified a de novo mutation in our child that is likely the cause of her issues.

They test about 2,500 genes that are associated with AS / ID

You can find out about the test here:

https://www.genedx.com/test-catalog/available-tests/autismid-xpanded-panel/

I hope this is helpful.

AJ
Read more
Epiphany
 11 hrs
Hello Peter - my son is almost 6 with ASD and ID (...
Hello Peter - my son is almost 6 with ASD and ID (had hypoxic ishemic event in utero/birth and significant interventions in the NICU). we've tried almost every biomedical treatment available from hard tank HBOT, MB12 injections, yasko protcol, walsh protocol, NAC, glutathione IV, thyroid therapies, laser therapy, etc, etc - to no avail. Nothing seems to make a material impact. We did try 1/4 pill clemastine and noticed an increase in language last year however it didn't stick. Have also tried verapamil. We relocated within northeast USA for my job and have noticed a severe regression since relocating - even from the low baseline. My son had been at 7-8 word fragmented sentences, now will not engage at all other than one word utterances. It went from "where is the black car toy" to just having a meltdown. Has also had significant visual stimms and is not really present but now has extreme attachments to a picture of a fan from a relative's house (perhaps reminds him of the past before we moved?). its been difficult to isolate if this is stress from the relo since he cognitively cannot process what happened, or biochemically something is off (we were giving clemastine throughout the move - not sure if its negative reaction there). he went from being moderate ASD with an ID to severe ASD with an ID. we are trying to get an Rx for bumentanide. not sure if you have any thoughts on 1) the regression since the relocation or 2) the overall lack of success with any treatment we've tried over the past 5+ yrs). any feedback is greatly appreciated. thank you, kevin.
Read more
Epiphany
 15 hrs
http://congresso.sigu.net/2018/documenti/Abstract....
http://congresso.sigu.net/2018/documenti/Abstract.pdf
Read more
Epiphany
 21 hrs
Hi Carla, Would you kindly share the link to the ...
Hi Carla,

Would you kindly share the link to the paper you have quoted from? I can't seem to find it when I search.

Thanks!

AJ
Read more
Epiphany
 21 hrs
my daughter is followed at Genetic Medical Unit of...
my daughter is followed at Genetic Medical Unit of Siena....they did exome sequencing with 150 autistic patients..I am angry because they never offered WES for my daughter...i suspect because she does not have obvious dysmorphic signs.... COD. C01 Lesson from exome analysis of 150 trios with ASD

F. Mari1,2, A. Currò1,2, C. Fallerini1 , D. Lopergolo1,2, M. Baldassarri1,2, V. Lamacchia1,2, M.G. Cannone1 , S. Croce1 , S. Daga1 , G. Doddato1 , E. Gelli1 , A. Giliberti1 , E. Lazzarini1 , F. Lorenzetti1 , M. Palmieri1 , S. Amitrano2 , M. Bruttini1,2, F.T. Papa1 , R. Tita2 , C. Lorizzo2 , M.A. Mencarelli2 , A.M. Pinto2 , S. Buoni3 , L. Radice2 , S. Grosso4 , R. Canitano3 , F. Ariani1,2, S. De Rubeis5 , A. Renieri1,2 1Medical Genetics, University of Siena, Siena, Italy 2Genetica Medica, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy 3Child Neuropsychiatry, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese, Siena, Italy 4Clinical Pediatrics, Department of Molecular Medicine and Development, University of Siena, Siena, Italy 5Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029, USA

Here, we present data obtained from whole exome sequencing (WES) in 150 patients attending the Medical Genetics Unit of Siena and having a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). All these patients have been evaluated by expert clinicians of our Institution and pathogenic CNVs have been ruled out as the cause of the disease. The project is part of an International effort aiming at identifying the genetic causes of ASD (Autism Sequencing Consortium, Mount Sinai). WES identified the genetic basis of disease in 36% of patients: 14% were already known disease genes and 22% were novel candidates. Among the known genes, SCN2A is recurrently mutated. Interestingly, SCN2A and KCNQ3 mutated patients do not show epilepsy, the key feature of the known associated phenotype. Our data also reinforce the association between SYNGAP1 and PHIP genes with ASD. From a clinical point of view, the identification of PHIP mutations teaches us not to underestimate more common signs such as obesity. PHIP binds the pleckstrin homology domain of insulin receptor substrate-1, a gene modulating insulin signalling and obesity can be a key clinical handle for the diagnosis of PHIP-related neurodevelopmental disorder. More attention has also to be paid to dysmorphology even if no other congenital anomalies are observed. PHIP patients show distinct facial features that can be recognizable such as large ears, thick eyebrows, upturned nose and thin lips. Among the X-linked mutated genes, we confirmed SLC6A8 and PCDH19 as ASD genes in males and females, respectively. Among the new candidates, we identified BCORL1, SLC12A2, CABLES1 and LYPLA2. BCORL1 is expressed in brain and reported mutated in two brothers with severe intellectual disability; SLC12A2 is a NaK-Cl cotransporter highly expressed in human developing cortical neurons; CABLES1 is a gene required for embryonic neural development and LYPLA2 is a gene needed for axon growth and maintenance differentially expressed in ASD. In conclusion, in our experience, WES analysis has a high success rate in ASD patients. Moreover, these data confirm that ASD is an heterogeneous collection of different rare disorders. Reverse phenotyping in large cohorts will help to better characterize the distinct clinical signs associated to each ASD gene.carla marta
Read more
Epiphany
 22 hrs
And a bit more info for additional reading: https...
And a bit more info for additional reading:

https://braincanada.ca/funded_grants/dysregulation-of-integrated-stress-response-isr-pathway-in-fragile-x-syndrome-and-autism/

https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/460840v2.full

https://www.cell.com/neuron/pdf/S0896-6273(17)30926-1.pdf

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318342262_Inhibition_of_the_integrated_stress_response_reverses_cognitive_deficits_after_traumatic_brain_injury

AJ
Read more
Epiphany
 22 hrs

NEW
Hello Peter and Community, I read a very interest...
Hello Peter and Community,

I read a very interesting article a couple of days ago and it made me wonder if the process of Integrated Stress Response could be affected at least some ASD kids:

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-11-protein-homeostasis-memory-deficits-syndrome.html

While the story is about T21 kids, the same process could be impacting at least some ASD kids (in my opinion) depending on the cause of their ASD.

So I took a quick look and voila:

https://www.sfari.org/funded-project/dysregulation-of-the-integrated-stress-response-pathway-in-fragile-x-syndrome/

It's being studies at McGill University in Montreal

So I decided to look into ISR to see if there were any options and … https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6600673/

Quercetin! Interestingly enough, the title of the paper speaks to Quercetin improving memory due to ISR!

Of course, Quercetin isn't very bioavailable so a quercetin phytosome may be a better option than standard but it may be worth trialing just in case ISR is a factor.

AJ
Read more
Epiphany
 22 hrs
Hi Agnieszka, I knew you would like the comment ab...
Hi Agnieszka, I knew you would like the comment about Poland as a tropical destination ;-) My wife told me this morning that with the windchill it felts like -14C (although today's high will reach -3C). I just checked the weather in a major city in Poland and it said the high will be +8C.

+8C would feel like a day in California to me now.

By the way, I really like your comment about Telemedicine. It would be great if knowledgeable doctors around the world could be accessed via Telemedicine for ASD related prescriptions.

Also, I went to our Developmental Pediatrician armed with the clinical trial results for Bumetanide and of course your document, and the doctor was very interested. Given the impact on kidneys, the doctor is still very hesitant but checking with other specialists to see if possible. So your document was very helpful in getting this far :-)

Hope you have a wonderful day Agnieszka, and for just enough snow to hide the leaves but not enough to have to shovel the driveway

AJ
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Thanks for sharing such an interesting article. Go...
Thanks for sharing such an interesting article. Got to know about something new. I also like to share my experienced product called 5-HTP. Helped me a lot to reduce my stress.
Link : https://easyvitamins.co.uk/product/5-htp-200mg-support-for-sleeping/
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Agnieszka, my IQ enhancers are:- Bumetanide/Azose...
Agnieszka, my IQ enhancers are:-

Bumetanide/Azosemide/KBr
Atorvastatin (but for FXS use Lovastatin, since there is evidence)
Micro-dose Clonazepam
Clemastine
DMF
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Ling, ideally genetic testing at every diagnosis o...
Ling, ideally genetic testing at every diagnosis of autism in a child is the way to go. It is not done because it costs a lot of money and the “yield” in terms of actionable therapy is very low. Many therapies would be experimental and that is not the way of modern medicine, it would open Pandora’s box.

I think all girls with severe autism and MR/ID should have exome sequencing (WES) because it is very likely that the test will yield a precise diagnosis. Girls are unlikely to have severe polygenic (multiple hit) autism, they have built in protection (a second X chromosome and neuroprotective female hormones).

Using WES in polygenic autism is unlikely to yield much. There are differentially expressed genes (DEGs) but no single “smoking gun” to find.

I was recently contacted by the father of an adult with severe autism who has recently had genetic testing that revealed a single gene dysfunction that relates to PAK1, so should be potentially treatable, albeit experimentally. No surprise that it is again a female.
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Having a child with a genetic mutation that causes...
Having a child with a genetic mutation that causes both cognitive deficiencies and tooth abnormalities I have definitely looked at the subject.
With this combo I really think there are chances to get a result on genetic testing, but not only one gene.

/Ling
Read more

Epiphany
 2 days
AJ, you made my day speaking of Poland as a tropic...
AJ, you made my day speaking of Poland as a tropical destination :-))) I haven't seen any sun for almost a week, it's freezing cold, raining every day and gets dark in the early afternoon. We are too far south to see aurora borealis and too far north to have locally produced wine - November is definitely to avoid at this latitude if you want to warm up ;-)

Who knows, maybe the time will come for telemedicine in autism as in this story about longevity online clinic from the US. Coincidentally it’s about metformin as this blog post:
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/10/06/sajad-zalzala-launched-qalytude-which-is-dedicated-to-anti-aging.html

Peter, you mention here cognitive improvement as helpful to learn life skills e.g. brushing teeth or tying shoe laces etc. For all of of them one needs also good motor skills and this is an issue in some autism, “grossly underestimated” according to this recent article:

https://www.spectrumnews.org/news/motor-problems-in-autistic-people-may-be-grossly-underestimated/?fbclid=IwAR2j8-6OjKQzOjsM-qTpsA7IgguiCHzJRdu3ohyxijUbUiAIG2HO2nXrb6A

Clearly, there are persons with autism who would be totally aware how to brush the teeth and what for, but not able to do it because of motor planning issues.
Just wonder if treatments improving motor skills could be listed as in the potential IQ enhancers list. Clemastine? And… ?

Can't wait for the snow to hide all these leaves in the garden :-)
Read more



Epiphany
 9 hrs
very interesting, i want to investigate this
very interesting, i want to investigate this
Read more
Epiphan
Sorry for the delay in responding and thank you fo...
Sorry for the delay in responding and thank you for your feedback. I do have it for free on the NHS and the dose is fixed at 162mg/week. In a nutshell the drug has fried my nervous system, I'm continuing to take it as its the only way to avoid an aneurysm and I have learned how to cope for example how to get a good nights sleep. I don't seem to have any different traits but obviously at 53 its all "burned in" and I'm not likely to change overnight. Since I have meniere's its reasonable to assume some neurological disturbance in the acoustic nerves and left side sensory deficit is a feature here, and perhaps the tocilizumab is making that much worse, since the drug is known to be contraindicated in people with nervous system problems. However I don't really have any other signs of MS for example. The mind boggles :)
Read more
Epiphany
 14 hrs
carla marta, premature tooth eruption is a biomark...
carla marta, premature tooth eruption is a biomarker for ADNP mutation. Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) is the most frequent de novo mutated ASD-related gene.

https://www.nature.com/articles/tp201727

It might be a good idea to ask your doctor to check this gene.

I suggest other parents who notice unusual physical features/developments like this to look them up and see if they are connected to a specific autism variant.
Read more

Epiphany
 17 hrs
i agree with your brilliant post.....my daughter l...
i agree with your brilliant post.....my daughter lost a milktooth at age 4 and developped her first permanent tooth at same age...permanent teeth were very
precocious ...and very precocious was tooth decay so we have a long long history of dental care and dental troubles...to make things worse, at night she has bruxism. Her anterior permanent incisors grew protruding above her milkteeth and milkteeth did not fall by themselves,they were pulled out by dentist, who said " it can happen" I wonder if this is autism related in some way.... carla marta
Read more



Epiphany
 20 hrs
My son has been progressively much better at the d...
My son has been progressively much better at the dentist over the years, but I still need to hold his arms down some of the time even though I had to be a human straightjacket back when he was 4. The dentists at the pracrice we go to are known to be be special needs friendly so they have no problem with this unorthodox way of doing things. I am significantly above average in muscle size and strength so I can still do this safely even though my 10 year old is 160 pounds plus and very strong himself. I am not sure how much longer I will be relatively stronger than him to do this job, but with his recent improvements hopefully I won't need to hold his arms down anymore even though he is great now about keeping his mouth open and following the dentists commands.

I used to have to do the same thing for haircuts but the last couple of years I have not had to do a thing except stand nearby in case he flipped out for aome reason because you can never let your guard down in these situations unless you want to risk law enforcement involvement or a lawsuit.
Read moreEpiphany
 23 hrs
Dear All, especially Christina & Peter Do you ...
Dear All, especially Christina & Peter
Do you have any idea how can I order these best quality brands of broccoli sprouts in Poland, or in EU? I tried many eshops including Cell-Logic, SuperSprout/AUS and Avamcol/Nutramaxstore but none of them ships to Poland/EU. Would be extremely grateful if you can help. Thanks !
approximately inflammation
Read more
Epiphany
 23 hrs
it is a hypoxia modifier, it might have some effec...
it is a hypoxia modifier, it might have some effect in those with mitochondrial abnormalities and cellular respiration.
Obviously it is very effective in what it does as its considered doping in sports for humans aswell.
approximately inflammation
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
What Dr Bird has found regarding low doses of drug...
What Dr Bird has found regarding low doses of drugs affecting GABAa receptors is real. I was surprised that such off-label prescribing existed in Australia, it is usual only in the US. In the US the best known case is Jay A. Goldstein, who in the end had to surrender his license. He published many papers and books regarding treating brain dysfunctions, some of what he says is true, but often people do not know where to draw the line.
Treatment
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Hi Ling! With the snow we just got, I can't e...
Hi Ling!

With the snow we just got, I can't even see where my garden was ;-)

The good news is that it hides all the leaves that were there that I hadn't dealt with yet …

Hope all is well Ling!

AJ
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Hi Peter, thanks for the advice! I will look to se...
Hi Peter, thanks for the advice! I will look to see where the closest MAPS docs are to me. I'm actually not that far from the US border, if I can't find one close to where I'm at in Toronto.

I just checked the weather in Poland … it's a veritable tropical destination compared to the cold snap we have here - I may consider it just to warm up :-) . My daughter is singing Christmas songs based on how much snow she is seeing … I feel like I'm on Hoth.

I am actually moving slowly these days in terms of therapeutic options as I'm hoping to get some clarity on my daughter's mutation from a research team working on that gene, hopefully in the next couple of months. I'm hoping that once I have some more clarity, I'll be able to determine if affecting intracellular chloride levels are even relevant to my situation, before I even trial Bumetanide, but I've been trying to find a doc in the meantime just in case it would be relevant.

I've also been thinking about contacting Servier to see if they would be open to extending the clinical trial of bumetanide to at least one site in Canada. Unlikely I know, but I'm always willing to try.

Have a great day Peter!

AJ
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Valentina, I wanted to tell you another thing I fo...
Valentina, I wanted to tell you another thing I forgot to mention in my last reply to you - since my son has been on this medicine regimen, suddenly he has become very interested in art and has been painting so much. His handwriting has also improved. He is so happy and at peace. He has finally gained some weight too. He was always rail thin.. With the artwork - it is a very different side of him- as if he is a more thoughtful and deliberate kid. Whereas before his thrill seeking athletic endeavors ruled the day - so it is nice to see his interest in art now. Like you mentioned in the other comment - if the medicine is helping so much it will be hard to think about stopping. But this is doctor’s orders for now. We will see how things go.
antibiotic
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Hi Peter, have you done a trial of LDN therapy? Or...
Hi Peter, have you done a trial of LDN therapy? Or have you heard from your readers that have? http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/content/293/2/607.long
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
The obvious question is would just supplementing k...
The obvious question is would just supplementing ketone BHB supplements directly improve vascular function in the manner described in this paper, or do you need to constantly be in a state of ketosis which has mixed health effects, or do you actively need to fast every day for 24 hours.
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
I want to learn more about NRF-1. It seems to link...
I want to learn more about NRF-1.
It seems to link to not only NRF2, but also to estrogenic activity, NMDA receptors, mitochondrial activity and neurite outgrowth and much more.

The first article here has a title that might put you down, but some parts of it does look interesting:

"dysregulation of NRF1 and its targets may be involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases
()
NRF1 is an emerging potential target for therapeutic intervention for brain diseases, including AD
()
estrogen effects on brain cells may be in part mediated through ROS signaling biomolecules that regulate estrogen-induced NRF-1 activation. This, in turn, may control the expression of NRF-1-regulatable genes
()
NRF1 regulates neurite outgrowth. NRF1 regulates important subunits of NMDA receptors—NR1 and NR2b (Grin1 and Grin2b) and AMPA receptor subunit 2 (GluR2).
()
NRF1 regulates targets genes with diverse functions, including cell growth, apoptosis/autophagy, mitochondrial biogenesis, genomic instability, neurogenesis, neuroplasticity, synaptogenesis, and senescence"

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5187886/

And for anyone with interest in NMDArs maybe add some reading from this one:
NRF-2 regulates the expression of the same NMDA receptor subunit genes as NRF-1: Both factors act by a concurrent and parallel mechanism to couple energy metabolism and synaptic transmission

"NRF-2 functionally regulates critical Grin1 and Grin2b subunits of NMDA receptors
Silencing NRF-2 prevented KCl-induced up-regulation of Grin1, Grin2b, and COX
()
NRF-2 (GABP) transcriptionally coregulates energy metabolism and neuronal activity
NRF-2 and NRF-1 regulate NMDA receptors and COX in a concurrent and parallel manner"

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3518722/

So, it looks like anyone benefitting from NRF-2 upregulators might be interested to try something that enhances NRF-1 too(?)

/Ling

Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
AJ, there are MAPS doctors in the US prescribing B...
AJ, there are MAPS doctors in the US prescribing Bumetanide, even Dr Frye. You could look for a MAPS doctor in Canada, or find one in the US. Either that, or pay a visit to Agnieszka in Poland.
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Ling, that is possible, but I found there was a po...
Ling, that is possible, but I found there was a positive effect on cessation. So a single dose might well be all that is needed, from time to time.
Read more


Epiphany
 2 days
That is odd. Do you think it's possible there ...
That is odd. Do you think it's possible there is an initial negative effect that can be followed by a positive one by long-term use? After all DMF first enhances oxidative stress.

/Ling
Read more
Epiphany
 2 days
Thank you AJ! I'm having a busy but also incre...
Thank you AJ! I'm having a busy but also incredible week here to.
I have no idea yet if your link has any relevance to SATB2, but maybe. SATB1 and SATB2 are somewhat in opposition to each other. I really hope I'm not dealing with zombie cells, they sound nasty. Like a Halloween post of Peter's.

Thanks anyway!
/Ling
Read more
Epiphany
 2 days
Isn't it odd that the authors of this paper su...
Isn't it odd that the authors of this paper suggest Vitexin for newborns if the hormonal effects are so many? But of course, it might only be for a short course.
Given that Bumetanide can have ototxic effects in newborns, I doubt Vitexin will ever be tried in this group.

We just had our first snow, but I'm still behind with my heaps of leaves in the garden. :-D

/Ling
Read more

Epiphany
 2 days

NEW
Hi Peter, Thanks so much for the insights into Vi...
Hi Peter,

Thanks so much for the insights into Vitexin! It always seems, in the world of biology, that a compound that affects a target of interest (e.g. target X) often seems to produce unintended consequences (e.g. in targets Y, Z, and alpha).

I have been talking to a physician about Bumetanide, but there are such hesitations that it's unlikely this physician will trial it.

I'll just go back to shoveling snow now :-)

AJ
Read more



Epiphany
 4 hrs
AJ, I think you mentioned Vitexin previously. I di...
AJ, I think you mentioned Vitexin previously. I did actually buy some, but have never used it.

Vitexin has been shown to have similar effects to estrogen. It is after all used for fertility related issues in women, but also in men (hence the Chaste Berry).

Vitexin could be considered a kind of hormone replacement therapy for people who do not want to go to the doctor.

It makes sense that vitexin affects NKCC1, but it has many other effects on a range of hormones.

I think it is much safer to use bumetanide or azosemide for the NKCC1 effect, unless you want the hormonal effects. Changing the level of estrogen, prolactin etc will cause a cascade of other effects.

Good luck clearing the snow at home, all I have to do is rake up the leaves.
Read more
hany
 13 hrs
Hello Peter, Ling, and Friends! Hope everyone is ...
Hello Peter, Ling, and Friends!

Hope everyone is doing well (and not in the middle of a snowstorm as I am …)

I wanted to share a paper with everyone, and would appreciate any thoughts you may have on the subject. The paper can be found here:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6011387/

The paper is called "Vitexin reduces epilepsy after hypoxic ischemia in the neonatal brain via inhibition of NKCC1"

In this paper, Vitexin appears to inhibit NKCC1, and is found in Passion Flower, Hawthorn, Chaste Berry.

Has anyone had any experience with any supplements that include Vitexin?

Thanks in advance,

AJ
Read more
Epiphany
 14 hrs
Hi Ling! Hope all is well. Sorry for the late re...
Hi Ling!

Hope all is well.

Sorry for the late response, it has been super busy on my end, and I'm just finally able to take a few minutes to sit and respond.

Yes, I had looked at autophagy some time ago, and thanks for the article!

I actually bought Lithium but haven't trialed it yet, but have been using Pterostilbene (which, if I remember correctly, you may be using as well). I've been operating under the assumption that Pterostilbene is inducing autophagy in neurons similarly to what Resveratrol would do, but it may be that more is needed than just Pterostilbene in my case.

No single supplement / intervention has had a "wow" impact yet, and I have been in a holding pattern for a while of late. The various researchers working on my daughter's suspected genetic cause are likely to have some updates soon that I'm hoping will help guide my next steps.

I did just find something of potential interest for you:

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2019-11-pathway-parkinson.html

I know your focus is SATB2, but when I saw this, not being an expert on the SATB family, wondered if there was any value to this finding depending on potential relationships / interactions between SATB1 and SATB2, but wanted to share.

I'm about to post something else of interest to you, Peter and the community.

Have a great day!

AJ








Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Epiphany
 3 days
Thank you both for your replies. She has over sens...
Thank you both for your replies. She has over sensitive body,under responsive vestibular, attention issues,IQ on the 98th centile despite being brought down by a low spatial reasoning score. Poor gross and fine motor skills/dyspraxia. Hypermobility and dyslexia. Her speech and vocabulary are fine. High anxiety levels. I can't think of anything else.

I will look at the website and genetic testing now. Thanks again.
Read more
Epiphany
 3 days
The amantadine is wonderful for fatigue without ma...
The amantadine is wonderful for fatigue without making me feel over stimulated like amphetamine. Last year my neurologist offered to let me try amantadine or memantine and I picked the amantadine at the time for that reason. I will say when I first started it it rook me about a week to get used to how it affects my sense of time for like crossing the street i.e. I take 100mg twice a day, but my insurance only covers the 100 liquid release caplets, I've always been curious how I would do taking 50mg if my insurance covered the 100mg tablets. I still am going to reply in more detail I just have a hard time getting my thoughts out but I wanted to make sure I shared about how it affected my sense of time the first few days. I definitely recommend trying amantadine.
Read more
Epiphany
 3 days
thanks for sharing it. custom CBD boxes
thanks for sharing it.
custom CBD boxes
Read more
Epiphany
 3 days
It is best to narrow down the type of autism/Asper...
It is best to narrow down the type of autism/Asperger’s, which can be done by looking at any medical comorbidities and just observations like “tiredness”. Many Aspies do share what works for them on sites like Reddit.

The Amantadine used by Martin in the comment above looks not a bad place to start.

Amantadine: A Review of Use in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3565716/

Antioxidants like NAC and ALA are effective in many people and you would see any effect in a day or so. NAC Sustain is the product I think works best.

All kinds of things can help aggression, it depends on the biological cause. In my son it is an L-type calcium channel blocker. Our reader Nancy found that a BCAA supplement works wonders.

I think medical comorbidities often provide the clues.

If money is no issue you could do genetic testing. GeneDX has been recommended by some readers and they have a special test looking at autism genes.

Asperger's is different in terms of the scale of the biological issues. If you have normal IQ, normal motor skills and you can speak fluently, the issues are much more subtle that in classic autism. Some Aspies doe respond to the same therapies as those with Classic autism, for example Bumetanide, but some seem to find the answer in psychotropic drugs, which are not usually legal.

I suggest you talk to some middle-aged Aspies. With the internet it is easy.
Read more
Epiphany
 4 days
Hello Peter, thank you so much for all of this inf...
Hello Peter, thank you so much for all of this information. I read so many research studies but find the information inconclusive or contradictory. My daughter would be classed as having Asperger's, although a milder form of asd, in her case this is quite severe. Before finding this blog I tried Swanson's sulforaphane for a few weeks with no difference. I also started Tau-Biotic butyrate. I have stopped both now. She struggles with irritability, aggression, tiredness as usual but despite a high IQ she isn't open minded or interested enough to start any 'talking' therapy. Please can you advise what you would try? I saw on another post you said Asperger's is more of a hormonal problem. Any advice is much appreciated. Thank you!
Read more

Epiphany
 5 days
Martin, I am glad that you are finding useful inte...
Martin, I am glad that you are finding useful interventions.

Amantadine has 3 main effects:-

Antiviral
NMDA antagonist/blocker
Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist (like many antipsychotics and antidepressants)

Memantine has these main effects:-

NMDA antagonist/blocker
Seratonin 5-HT3 receptor antagonist/blocker
antagonist at different neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) including alpha7, which is relevant
agonist at the dopamine D2 receptor

So the two drugs do have some overlap in their effect, but there are some big differences.

I don't think Amantadine had had much mention in this blog, but it is used by psychiatrists and even in autism.

Amantadine: A Review of Use in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3565716/

Double-blind, placebo-controlled study of amantadine hydrochloride in the treatment of children with autistic disorder.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11392343


How would you describe the effect of your extended release verapamil?
Read more




Epiphany
 14 hrs
I have been trying to figure out how to ask my doc...
I have been trying to figure out how to ask my doctor for a statin for months but I'm worried they'll just say no. Metformin has been on my "wishlist" since before even finding your blog. I also wonder if I would do better on immediate release verapamil because I'm prescribed extended release. I have been finding fluvoxamine and clemastine helpful.

One other thing I've been curious about is if your research on memantine would also apply to admantadine. I take 100mg amantadine twice a day.
Read more
Epiphany
 21 hrs
There are many such paradoxes and particularly in ...
There are many such paradoxes and particularly in neuropathy. I found an interesting paper on DMF be effective in treating neuropathy. I have a nerve that got damaged and a tiny dose of DMF within hours has an effect, but it is a negative effect. Then if you cease the DMF the negative effect fades away and you seem to end up better than you were at the start. PEA is effective in my case.
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day

NEW
Looking into the NLRP3 inflammasome again - thanks...
Looking into the NLRP3 inflammasome again - thanks Peter, I enjoy some of your earlier posts on the subject!

Came across this paper mentioning a two-hit model for neuropathic pain where a short course of morphine actually prolonged the pain (for months) via NLPR3/P2X7/TLR4.
There is probably a link from pain to peripheral inflammasome to neurons here that I don't grasp yet.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4914184/#!po=0.403226

/Ling
Read more
Epiphany
 2 days
AJ, was it you who was looking into autophagy rece...
AJ, was it you who was looking into autophagy recently?
You probably have seen this article:

Autophagy Activator Drugs: A New Opportunity in Neuroprotection from Misfolded Protein Toxicity
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6412775/

Mentions resveratrol, trehalose, verapamil, metformin, lithium and a bunch of well-known drugs such as rapamycin.
Maybe nothing new, but worth taking a quick glance at.

/Ling
Read more
Epiphany
 2 days
Thank you so much Peter, I will take it into accou...
Thank you so much Peter, I will take it into account in the selection process of the new assistant.
Valentina
Read more
Epiphany
 2 days
Valentina, in the above I mean that if the Assista...
Valentina, in the above I mean that if the Assistant is liked by the girls in class, they are automatically more inclined to include the boy she is supporting.
Read more
Epiphany
 2 days
Tocilizumab is usually given for arthritis and is ...
Tocilizumab is usually given for arthritis and is extremely expensive, if you do not have it free on the UK health service.

If you have auto-immune illnesses, this alone could cause some Asperger's traits. Has your Asperger's mellowed?

In this post I was really wondering what would happen to someone with severe autism and auto-immune problems. Given a potent IL-6 inhibitor like your drug, would their autism significantly improve.

Tocilizumab can be given as a variable dose by the patient's weight, rather than a pre-filled syringe. You would also think they could inject only part of the pre-filled syringe, although the doctor might see that as a huge waste, given the cost.
Read more
Epiphany
 3 days
Valentina, a good Assistant for high school can be...
Valentina, a good Assistant for high school can be male or female. I think you will find far more good Assistants who are female, because the qualities an Assistant needs are much more common in females.

Monty has a female assistant who is 10 years older than him. She is accepted by the students as if she was his big sister, not his mother. In high school you do not want the other kids to see the Assistant as another teacher, otherwise they will reduce their interaction with your son.

You want an Assistant who is fun/cool and definitely not with Asperger’s themselves.

A good female Assistant will do just fine with boy-girl behavior and emotions, probably much better than most males. Teenage girls also like a big sister (the Assistant) to get advice from. So it actual helps the social interactions.
Read more
Epiphany
 3 days
Peter, next year my son will be on High school, do...
Peter, next year my son will be on High school, do you think that would be better to change for a man assistant who explains him boy-girl behavior and emotions? My son is very clever but of course there are many things he still doesn't know.
Valentina
Read more

Epiphany
 3 days
Hi Peter, I'm not very austistic but am mensa...
Hi Peter,

I'm not very austistic but am mensa qualified and I score highly in aspergers traits test and have had huge health issues which noone can find a cause for, I never experience anxiety or depression which is the only logical clinical conclusion.

As a result of these illnesses I ended up on Tocilizumab, which is an IL-6 inhibitor. On day2 after the first subcutaneous injection, I was able to do things all day long, which has not been the case for at least 12 years. My rheumatologist found this surprising.

Since then its been a rough ride, the drug is causing all sorts or problems, probably because its too much but in the UK you are only licensed for a fixed dose at the moment.

I thought you might find this interesting, we can make email contact if you'd like to dig deeper, I'll keep an eye on this thread for your response.
Read more





Epiphany
 4 hrs
It is an interesting substance. It is another subs...
It is an interesting substance. It is another substance which is an existing research chemical which they will make into a hugely expensive drug.

If you have autism and respond to the gluten free diet, you would very likely respond to larazotide acetate.

Will most people with autism/PANDAS respond to larazotide acetate? I doubt it.

I think for sure a number of people with autism and GI problems would benefit. For the moment you would have to buy the chemical and make your own pills.

For those with celiac disease:-

"Larazotide acetate 0.5 mg reduced signs and symptoms in CeD patients on a gluten-free diet better than a gluten-free diet alone,"

Biochem/physiol Actions
Larazotide acetate (AT1001) is a Zonulin receptor antagonist, a tight junction modulator. Larazotide inhibition of zonulin results in reducing trafficking across epithelial cells in the intestines and reducing intestinal permeability and "leaky gut," thought to be a gateway to multiple autoimmune diseases, including celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD, Crohn′s and ulcerative colitis), type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), chronic kidney disease (CKD) and several others. It has been shown to inhibit the effect of inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) and interleukin (IL-4), blocking their increase of intestinal epithelial permeability.


Read more




Epiphany
 3 hrs
B12 does seem to benefit some people with autism, ...
B12 does seem to benefit some people with autism, but certainly not all and some people have a negative reaction.
Read more
Epiphany
 3 hrs
Caroline, I am answering here the questions from b...
Caroline, I am answering here the questions from both of your comments.

Broccoli sprouts, in the presence of an enzyme called myrosinase, produces sulforaphane. Sulforaphane activates Nrf-2, which turns on the body’s antioxidant genes. A secondary effect of activating Nrf-2 it an increase in the level of serotonin in the brain.

Some broccoli supplements add back myrosinase. Myrosinase is also produced by gut bacteria. The result is that broccoli powder is likely to have a highly variable result. The quality of these supplements was very poor, but may well have improved with all the attention in the last few years given to Sulforaphane. I used an Australian product called Supersprouts. I now use DMF to activate Nrf-2, which gives a precise consistent effect.

Stimming by putting fingers in front of your eyes is quite common. In many people this type of stimming goes away by using NAC. NAC is a very effective antioxidant. Antioxidants are only helpful if you have oxidative stress, if you don’t have oxidative stress they leave you worse off, because the body over compensates by reducing production of its own anti-oxidants.

People with mild autism only have some features of the severe condition. These features mainly relate to central hormonal dysfunction. They have issues with Serotonin, Oxytocin, Vasopressin etc. This causes problems with empathy, emotions, social understanding etc.

These social/emotional issues can be tackled with therapy to teach the learner skills that are instinctive in his peers. This may be the best strategy.

Adult Aspies who are not happy with who they have grown up to be often seek to “tune up” their emotional response by targeting serotonin receptors. These are “recreational drugs”.

The next generation of FDA autism drugs are mainly targeted at people like your son who just need a little bit of therapy. These are the drugs that involve Oxytocin and Vasopressin.

I think the value of therapy (explaining emotions, what is cool, boy-girl behaviour etc) is underrated. With a person of high IQ you can explain to them, while growing up, the things they do not pick up naturally. I think this will be more effective than oxytocin or vasopressin nasal sprays.
Read more
Epiphany
 6 hrs
Hi Peter, I was reading your blog and overwhelmed...
Hi Peter,

I was reading your blog and overwhelmed with the amount of information. My boy is almost 8 yrs old and grew out of many asd symptoms. However, from time to time I observe he put hands in front of his eyes and wiggles them fast as if playing with them. Also, he isn’t as social as his peers. It’s more like a happy and shy kid. What does broccoli sprout powder help with? Will it be the switch in here? Which broccoli sprout powder is recommended? Thanks!
Read more
Epiphany
 6 hrs
Dear Peter, Thank you for all the information her...
Dear Peter,

Thank you for all the information here. What does broccoli sprout powder do? NAC is for oxidative stress, bunetanude is for lowering chloride in brain, and broccoli sprout for? My soon to be 8 yrs old tip toe, flap, not very verbal at 2.5 years old. With help of vitamin bs, fish oil, fulvic Humic minerals, probiotics, and a clean diet, he has progressed a lot. He is in mainstream school and needed no support. However, there are times that I see, he put his fingers in front of his eyes and wiggles them. He plays with his fingers. It’s a big distraction. Is that considered stimming? It’s on and off. He is a happy child, look more like Asperger as he isn’t as social as his peers. He can exchange a short conversation back forth. Will broccoli sprout be the switch here?? Thanks for any input you may have. Thanks!

Caroline
Read more
Epiphany
 7 hrs
I am curious if you have kept up with the research...
I am curious if you have kept up with the research on zonulin and larazotide acetate to regulate zonulin. I see they are in phase 3 clinical trials for celiac disease but I was curious what you thought about using it to repair the gut barrier for children with autism and PANDAS.
Read more
Epiphany
 15 hrs
Thank you for your informative blog. Do you have a...
Thank you for your informative blog. Do you have an opinion on the use of B12 for autism widely recommended by biomedical Drs.
Read more
Epiphany
 18 hrs
Thanks for sharing such an informative post.
Thanks for sharing such an informative post.
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Ok Peter, I give prednisone for 5 days and then wa...
Ok Peter, I give prednisone for 5 days and then wait for 2 weeks.I would think in using an immunemodulator as prevention. Should be something that I can get easly and with less side effects.
Valentina
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Valentina, it depends on what the underlying chang...
Valentina, it depends on what the underlying change was, which we do not know for sure. Hopefully things will return to normal after the prednisone, but it may take longer than 5 days, I would wait 2 weeks and then reassess the situation. If you give too many things you may make matters worse.
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day

NEW
Peter, many thanks, and thinking of the next step,...
Peter, many thanks, and thinking of the next step, could I use azithromycin as immunemodulator for one month or propranolol daily? or may be both?
Valentina
Read more




Epiphany
 33 min
Valentina, when there is a sudden shift in behavio...
Valentina, when there is a sudden shift in behaviour it is worth considering an aberrant immune reaction. There are likely many variations and generally only PANS/PANDAS gets talked about. The simple therapy for many of them is short term use of prednisone.

I had acute onset hearing loss in one ear and the ear specialist told me this is not a rare condition, but that it is usually ignored or misdiagnosed. It is an aberrant immune response in the inner ear that can be triggered by a common cold virus. If treated promptly with prednisone the problem is solved, if untreated you get permanent degradation in your hearing. The exact mechanism is not understood.

I would ask your doctor for a 5 day course of Prednisone 40mg.

Steroids should be taken early in the morning so as to interfere the least with the body's own hormones.

Short term use of steroids is safe, long term use causes many issues.

Monty has had a 5 day course of Prednisone on two occasions.

I think people with autism (and NT siblings) are predisposed to these aberrant immune reactions. There are probably common.

I would try this before resorting to Propranolol, which may treat the symptom, but will not address the cause.
Read more
Epiphany
 5 hrs
Hi Peter, since the virus flare, my son is worse t...
Hi Peter, since the virus flare, my son is worse than ever. He is having agressive episodes and can not stop laughing.Clemastine stopped working in this situation.I gave him propranolol and was the only thing that rescue him,helped tremendously. Could I give it daily or is not safe in a regular basis? Something is affecting my son.I don't know if it is virus, bacteria or his adolescence or something else, but he had not been like this since years.
Valentina
Read more
Epiphany
 23 hrs
Adam You can install a feed reader on your comput...
Adam

You can install a feed reader on your computer, like this free one

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/rss-feed-reader/pnjaodmkngahhkoihejjehlcdlnohgmp?hl=en

Then subscribe to the comment feed from my blog, by inputing the location of the feed.

https://epiphanyasd.blogspot.com/feeds/comments/default?alt=rss

This then gives you the comments from the last 24 yours.

It works, I just installed it on my computer.
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Look on google and ebay. It can be ordered from l...
Look on google and ebay.

It can be ordered from legitimate online pharmacies in the UK and Baltic states. It is just a question of whether they want to ship it to Spain.
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Adam, I would look up the pediatric dose of clemas...
Adam, I would look up the pediatric dose of clemastine for allergy. Dr Kelley has retired.

I think you can add clemastine at any point, it is just a question of attributing any positive effect to which the right substance.

The comments in the last 24 yours uses a service from Feedbucket, which has stopped. It did happen before and then they started again.

I added a different last 20 comments feature on the lower right if the screen. It worked for several days and then stopped. This is an issue with the feed provided by blogger/google.

All 3rd party add ins to blogs are unreliable.
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Where can we buy clemastine?I live in Spain.Here I...
Where can we buy clemastine?I live in Spain.Here I cant find.
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Adam, my 4½ yo 19 kg does 0,5 mg clemastine twice ...
Adam, my 4½ yo 19 kg does 0,5 mg clemastine twice a day without any problem and with a small effect.
Read more
Epiphany
 1 day
Thanks Peter. I looked at treatable-id.org and it ...
Thanks Peter. I looked at treatable-id.org and it looks very much like what they did for my kids at Sick Kid's in Toronto. They really do not have autism for a genetic reason. I look at our polymorphisms to determine the best way to treat but this is really an issue of ongoing Cell Danger response after a series of immune related stressors. This may not have ever happened if we had a different cluster of polymorphisms but it still required the external environmental insult. For example, I have some hereditary weakness that causes me to hallucinate when given aspirin. My mother is the same. When I contracted Lyme Disease 20 years ago along with the classic bulls eye rash I had severe Lyme arthritis that did not resolve until years later with Benfotiamine. I have come across studies that state that Lyme arthritis does not resolve in COX2 knockout mice. I would like to know how this might relate to the type of inflammation we have in case it would point to an intervention I haven't tried yet other then Benfotiamine. I know that COX 1 and 2 have been looked at in autism.
Read more